Topic Thirteen: Analyze, Compare and Create Shapes

Desired Results

Transfer:
1. Makes sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Established Goals:
  • K.G.4: Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).
  • K.G.5. Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.
  • K.G.6. Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, "Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?”

Student I Can Statements:
  • I can think about, compare and make different shapes.
  • I can think about and compare two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes.
  • I can make shapes by drawing them or by using things like sticks and clay.
  • I can use simple shapes to make larger shapes.
Big Ideas:

Comparison and Relationships
Numbers, expressions, measures, and objects can be compared and related to other numbers, expressions, measures, and objects in different ways.

Geometric Figures
Two- and three-dimensional objects with or without curved surfaces can be described, classified, and analyzed by their attributes. An object's location in space can be described quantitatively.

Practices, Processes, and Proficiencies
Mathematics content and practices can be applied to solve problems.
Essential Questions:

  • How can solid figures be named, described, compared and composed?
Students will know...
  • 2-D shapes can be sorted and identified by their attributes
  • Objects shaped like spheres, cones, and cylinders can roll. Objects shaped like cubes, cones, and cylinders can stack and slide.
  • The flat surfaces of many solid figures have specific 2-D shapes
  • Mathematicians know what the problem is about. They have a plan to solve it. They keep trying if they get stuck.
  • You can make 2-D shapes by putting together two or more 2-D shapes
  • When building a given 2-D shape, the shape must exhibit all of the attributes of the shape.
  • 3-D shapes can be combined to make other 3-D shapes

Vocabulary:
roll, slide, stack, flat surface,


Students will be skilled at...
  • Analyzing and comparing 2-D shapes
  • Analyzing and comparing 3-D shapes
  • Analyzing and comparing 2-D and 3-D shapes
  • Analyzing, comparing, and making different 2-D and 3-D shapes using math.
  • Constructing 2-D shapes using other 2-D shapes
  • Building 2-D shapes that match given attributes
  • Constructing 3-D shapes using given materials

Assessment Evidence

Performance Assessment:
Other Evidence:

Formative Assessment:

Learning Plan

Learning Activities:
13-1 Analyze and Compare Two-Dimensional (2-D) Shapes: Analyzing and comparing 2-D shapes
13-2 Analyze and Compare Three-Dimensional (3-D) Shapes: Analyzing and comparing 3-D shapes
13-3 Compare 2-D and 3-D Shapes: Analyzing and comparing 2-D and 3-D shapes
13-4 Math Practices and Problem Solving: Make Sense and Persevere: Analyzing, comparing, and making different 2-D and 3-D shapes using math.
13-5 Make 2-D Shapes from Other 2-D Shapes: Constructing 2-D shapes using other 2-D shapes
13-6 Build 2-D Shapes: Building 2-D shapes that match given attributes
13-7 Build 3-D Shapes: Constructing 3-D shapes using given materials
Resources:

Problem of the month:

Geometry


Centers:
Geometry Sentence Frames Set 1: Describing 2D Shapes
My 3D Shapes Book (ver. 2)


SmartBoard Activities/Games: